Tag Archives: Early Nigeria

How the Independence of Nigeria was Celebrated on Saturday, 1st of October, 1960 [With Videos]

Video of independence celebration in Nigeria, 1960​

The atmosphere was filled with joy and anxiety as excited Nigerians stormed the Tafawa Balewa Square (TBS) in Lagos to partake in the celebration of the independence of Nigeria on Saturday, 1st of October, 1960. Amongst the crowd were students, cultural dancers, acrobats, masquerades and others who were all eager to paint the celebration red with their performances. Policemen stood in bands in different key places across the square to prevent or suppress any form of unwanted intrusion. It was a wonderful sight to behold. Continue reading How the Independence of Nigeria was Celebrated on Saturday, 1st of October, 1960 [With Videos]

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Indirect Rule in Nigeria

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Lord Lugard

Let us begin with the definition of the indirect rule system. What is indirect rule? It is a system of administration used by the British colonial government to govern the people through the use of traditional rulers and traditional political institutions. The indirect rule system was introduced into to Nigeria by Continue reading Indirect Rule in Nigeria

The Nigerian Independence Constitution of 1960

 

Nigeria Independence Constitution

Let us begin with the definition of a constitution- A constitution is a set or body of agreed rules that guides a state or country in its administration. Before Nigeria became independent in 1960, series of constitutions had been used in administering the country, e.g. the Clifford constitution of 1922, the Richards constitution of 1946, the Macpherson constitution of 1951 and the Lyttleton Constitution of 1954. Each of these constitutions has its own features though they are related or linked to each other in one way or the other. Continue reading The Nigerian Independence Constitution of 1960

Real Accounts of The Nigerian Civil War (1967- 1970)

Biafra war

The Nigerian civil war, also known as the Biafran war which started on the 6th of July 1967 and ended on 15th of January 1970, was a war fought by Nigeria against Biafra to counter the secession of Biafra from the Republic of Nigeria. The Igbos felt they could no longer relate smoothly with the northern Continue reading Real Accounts of The Nigerian Civil War (1967- 1970)

Owambe The Western Way

owambe
Owambe

Owambe is “a large grandiose party thrown by Nigerians anywhere in the world, especially Yoruba Nigerians, that involves a lot of food, loud music, dancing and spraying- Nigerian term which means throwing currencies on someone dancing”. [Urban Dictionary].

Owambe is attended by many people and they are usually grouped according to their ‘aso ebi’ (family wears) which may come in different fabrics, colours and designs. Continue reading Owambe The Western Way

History of Nigerian Federalism

Governor Bernard Bourdillion
Governor Bernard Bourdillion

The history of Federalism in Nigeria can be traced to the division of the country into three provinces (Northern Province, Western Province and Eastern Province) by Governor Bernard Bourdillion in 1939. Governor Bernard Bourdillion (1935 – 1943) recommended the replacement of the provinces by regions which Arthur Richard’s Constitution later implemented in 1946. It was the idea of the Richard’s constitution that brought in a Federal structure but which it didn’t accomplish to the end. However, in 1953, Governor Macpherson’s constitution improved on that of Richard’s by creating House of Rep. with powers to make law for the country and Regional Houses of Assembly to make law for the regions. Later, in 1954, the Lyttleton constitution came in with a Federal system of government for the country. This was as a result of the constitutional conference that was held in London in 1953 (1953 London Constitutional Conference) where it was decided that Nigeria should become a Federal State.
Federalism is a system of government whereby power is constitutionally shared between the central government and other component units e.g. State/region and local government, but in 1954 there were only the central and regional government in Nigeria. Their powers and functions were shared to them by the constitution. Exclusive legislative functions were meant for the central government while concurrent legislative functions were meant for both the central and regional government and residual legislative functions were meant for the regions.

Here are some reasons why Federalism was introduced into Nigeria.

* Cultural diversity
* Fear of domination by the minorities
* The size of the country
* Geographical factor
* Bringing government nearer to the
people
*British colonial policy
* Economic factor
* Effective administration.

Reference:
* C. C. Dibie; Essential Government for Senior Secondary Schools; 3rd edition; Lagos; Tonad Publishers; 2008

Image Credit:
* wikipedia.org

Aba Women’s Riot (1929)

 

Aba women riotThe “riots” or the war, led by women in the provinces of Calabar and Owerri in southeastern Nigeria in November and December of 1929, became known as the “Aba Women’s Riots of 1929” in British colonial history, or as the “Women’s War” in Igbo history. Thousands of Igbo women organized a massive revolt against the policies imposed by British colonial administrators in Continue reading Aba Women’s Riot (1929)

How the Mid- Western Region was created

BiafranSoldiersInAsaba

On the 14th of June, 1955, an Action Group member of the then Western Region House of Assembly, Honorable M. S. Sowole tabled a motion at the sitting of the house. The motion reads: “I beg leave to move that this house prays Her Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom to make necessary constitutional arrangements at the proposed conference for a separate state of Benin and Delta provinces. Continue reading How the Mid- Western Region was created

Speech by the Governor General of Nigeria, Sir Frederick Lugard (Amalgamation Proclaimation of 1914) on January 1, 1914.

amalgamation-day-1914

You’ve always heard about the amalgamation of the Northern and Southern Protectorates which took place on the 1st of January, 1914. Then you should also have a glimpse of the event that led to the great nation called Nigeria.
Below is the speech of Lord Frederick Lugard on the Amalgamation day (Jan. 1, 1914).

“You are all aware that His Majesty’s Government, after long and mature consideration, Continue reading Speech by the Governor General of Nigeria, Sir Frederick Lugard (Amalgamation Proclaimation of 1914) on January 1, 1914.

Music in the early 70s- Lagos, Nigeria

Naija...

Lest we neglect the under-represented sounds of West African funk, the folks at Afro Strut have put together a magnificent 3-disc compilation that celebrates the movement.Nigeria 70reminds us of the spirit and diversity of the sounds that emerged around Lagos in the ’70s with nearly 150 minutes of music.
music
At the outset, let’s make it clear where this set stands: at the very pinnacle of African music compilations ever released. The subject certainly offers a rich field to mine, and the producers have done an amazing job bringing the music to life.
First, a bit of history. At a vortex Continue reading Music in the early 70s- Lagos, Nigeria