Category Archives: Government Studies

This section is created on OldNaija to support students studying government/ political science in various institutions in their academics and prepare them for international and local examinations like WAEC, NECO, UTME, POST UTME, NABTEB and so on.

Merits and Demerits of Macpherson Constitution of 1951

Macpherson constitution of 1951

Read the full details and features of the Macpherson constitution here.

Below are the merits/advantages and demerits/disadvantages of the Macpherson constitution of 1951

Merits/Advantages of Macpherson Constitution

1. It improved on Richards constitution of 1946 by consulting Nigerians during the drafting process.

2. It created the post of a minister. Continue reading Merits and Demerits of Macpherson Constitution of 1951

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Merits and Demerits of Richards constitution of 1946

Sir Arthur Richards
Sir Arthur Richards
Read the full details and features of the Richards constitution here.

Below are the merits and demerits (advantages and disadvantages) of the Richards constitution of 1946

Merits/advantages of Richards constitution

1. It brought about regionalism which served as a bedrock for federalism in Nigeria

2. Unlike the Clifford constitution of 1922, the people were consulted (though not really) in the drafting of Richards constitution. Continue reading Merits and Demerits of Richards constitution of 1946

Macpherson Constitution of 1951

Macpherson constitution of 1951

In 1948, Sir John Stuart Macpherson succeeded Sir Authur Richards as the Governor-General of Nigeria. Soon after he (Macpherson) resumed office, he began to draft a new constitution for the country. He was very patient and careful in the process so as not to repeat the mistake of his predecessor, Sir Authur Richards. Sir Authur Richards’ constitution, also known as Richards constitution of 1946, was severely criticized by Nigerian nationalists on the ground that it was imposed on Nigerians and operated without prior consultation. Continue reading Macpherson Constitution of 1951

Concepts of Government- Power And Authority

Political Power and Authority

Power

What is power?
Power is defined as the ability to affect someone’s behaviour through some sanctions.
(According to C. C Dibie’s Essential Government, “Power is the capacity to affect another’s behaviour by the threat of sanction. The sanctions may be negative or positive. Thus, a political leader may have the ability to control the actions of others by promising those who support him wealth or honours, or he may threaten to deny such rewards to those who oppose him. However, sanctions are used if there is non-compliance”.)

Continue reading Concepts of Government- Power And Authority

Pre-Colonial Political Administration of the Benin Empire

Pre-colonial administration of the Benin empire

The Edos of Benin inhabit the south western part of modern day Nigeria and are close neighbors of the Yorubas with whom they claim the same origin. The Benin pre-colonial system of government, like the Yorubas was monarchical. The Oba (a title used for the king of Benin) was the theoretical and political leader of the empire with absolute authority no one dares to challenge. Unlike a Yoruba king, he was not bounded by the constitution or laws of the land. He solely wielded the legislative, executive and judiciary powers of the empire. Howbeit, he was assisted in the administering the empire by a many councils and officials. The highest of the councils were the Uzama who advised the King on important matters concerning the affairs of the empire. But unlike a Yoruba king, he was not subjected to their advice and decisions; he could heed to them and dispose them at will. Besides advising the King, the Uzama were also saddled with the responsibility of crowning a new king (the eldest surviving son of the previous king).

Apart from the Uzama, there were a number of officials who helped the Oba in administering the empire. These included officials like ‘Unwagwe’ and ‘Eribo’ who were in charge of the empire’s trade. They monitored the flow of goods in the empire and advice the king on how the economy of the empire can be improved. There were also the gold and brass-smiths that took care of the empire’s craft and industry. Other notable and important officials were the ‘Ezomo’, ‘Ebohon’, ‘Iyasere’ and the ‘Ologbosere’, the chief priest. All these officials had specific roles they played in the administration of the empire.

Furthermore, the Benin Empire was divided into two classes; they were the nobles and the commoners. Traditional chiefs and administrative officials were mostly chosen from the noble class. These included: the ‘Iwebo’ who were in charge of the regalia; the ‘Ibiwe’ who supervised the king’s harem and the ‘Iwagwe’ who provided the king with personal attendants. On the other hand, the commoners were not involved in the administration of the empire. Their main concern was providing food for their communities. Each of the commoners owns a piece of land he/she cultivated. They were also hired by the nobles to work on their farms for a period of time in return for money, a piece of land or sometimes cancellation of debts.

 

References:

  • Ola Abiola; A Textbook of West African History; 3rd ed.; Ado-Ekiti; Omolayo Standard Press & Bookshops co. (Nig.) Ltd.; 1984

Definition, Characteristics and Types of Sovereignty

Government Studies on OldNaija

Definition of Sovereignty

What is Sovereignty?
Sovereignty is derived from the Latin word “Superanus” which means supreme or paramount.

Sovereignty is the supreme authority and power of a state to make and enforce laws/policies within its area of jurisdiction. The state exercise its power and authority in any way it can [either De facto or De Jure (they will be explained below)] without any means of external interference or control. The French philosopher, Jean Bodin (1530-1590), propounded the idea of sovereignty his publication of “The Republic” in 1576.

 

Continue reading Definition, Characteristics and Types of Sovereignty

Pre-Colonial Political System in Igboland

Igbo pre-colonial administration

The Igbo pre-colonial political system was described by many scholars as an ‘acephalous political system‘ which can be translated as ‘a leaderless or chiefless political system’. This term is suitable for describing the Igbo pre-colonial political system because it was decentralized and based on village and direct democracy where everyone in the village has the authority to contribute in decision making. Each Igbo village was seen as a political unit inhabited by related families who were bounded by common beliefs and origin. Each family head in the village held the ‘Ofo‘ title and altogether formed the council of elders. The council of elders presided over important issues on the village’s welfare, safety, development and so on. Among the council of elders, one was recognized as the most senior to others. He was the ‘Okpara‘. He could call for and adjourn a meeting, and could also give judgements as well.  Continue reading Pre-Colonial Political System in Igboland

Concepts of Government- Legitimacy

Government Studies on OldNaija

Definition of Legitimacy

The word legitimacy is coined from the Latin word “legitimus” which means according to law. Therefore, legitimacy can be defined as the recognition and acceptance which the citizens give their leaders to rule them. For a government to rule successfully in a state, it must enjoy the full support and popular acceptance of the electorates or citizens. This is the reason why legitimacy/ political legitimacy remain an important features of a government. A legitimate government comes to power through the consent of the people by voting it in. Many people believe that legitimacy cannot be found in a coercive government (military government). However, the military can enjoy legitimacy by making popular government policies. In a legitimate government, obedience is not based on fear of sanctions but on loyalty to the ruler and the state.

Continue reading Concepts of Government- Legitimacy

Characteristics And Functions Of Government

 

Below are the major Characteristics/Features and Functions of the Government in a State

Characteristics of Government

1. Constitution– This is a major characteristic of a government. The government make a set of agreed rules which guides it in the administration of the state.

2. Periodic Change– A government is meant to change after a specific period of time. No government is permanent, particularly a democratic or elective government which changes through periodic election.

3. Legitimacy– A government must enjoy the support of the people.

4. Revenue– The government make revenue in different ways to enhance its administration

5. Political Power– The government must posses political power which is a tool of rooting orderliness in a state. Continue reading Characteristics And Functions Of Government

The Definitions of Government

Government Studies on OldNaija

 

The Three Definitions Of Government

*Government As An Institution Of The State

Government as an institution of the state can be defined as a “machinery” set up by the state, to keep the state organised, run its affairs and administer its various functions and duties.
The coming together of people to live in a society arouse the need to form a body (government) which will handle the administration of the society. If a state should exist without this kind of body (government), anarchy is said to be reigning in such a state. Continue reading The Definitions of Government

Definition And Features of a State



What is a state? Or
What is the definition of a state?

“A state may be defined as a politically organised body of people inhabiting a defined geographical entity with an organized legitimate government”.
(Essential Government, C. C. Dibie, August 2008)

A state must be free from all forms of external control to exercise its sovereignty within its area of jurisdiction. It must be noted that Continue reading Definition And Features of a State

Merits And Demerits of Clifford Constitution of 1922

Government Studies on OldNaija

Click here to read the Clifford Constitution of 1922 and its features

Like every other constitution of a state, the Clifford Constitution has its advantages/merits and disadvantages/demerits.

Here are the merits of Clifford Constitution of 1922
Continue reading Merits And Demerits of Clifford Constitution of 1922

The Ibadan All-Nigerian Constitutional Conference of 1950

Nigerian Map

On the 9th of January, 1950, delegates from the northern, eastern and western regions of Nigeria met as a body in Ibadan to discuss issues on the new constitution Sir Macpherson was drafting (Macpherson constitution of 1951). Continue reading The Ibadan All-Nigerian Constitutional Conference of 1950

The Richards Constitution of 1946

Constitution Of Nigeria

Governor Bernard Bourdilloun succeeded Sir Hugh Clifford as the Governor General of Nigeria in 1939 and later left the office in 1945. In 1939, while still in power, he turned the Northern and Southern Protectorates into provinces and divided the Southern province into Eastern and Western provinces, while the Northern province remained untouched. Continue reading The Richards Constitution of 1946

Berlin Conference And The Partition of West Africa

Berlin Conference

In the due course to get a share of the African continent, all European nations participating in the struggle to have a colony in Africa had lost their decency and orderliness in the run. The tension and clashes among these competitors was boiling at its hottest degree. It was at that time that Otto Von Bismarck, a German Chancellor, convened a meeting at Berlin (Berlin Conference) with the purpose of resolving the disputes among the competitors without the use of arms. Continue reading Berlin Conference And The Partition of West Africa