Tag Archives: Colonial Era of Nigerian History

This era of Nigerian history began in 1800 and ended in 1960. It witnessed British rule in Nigeria.

‘Three Roads To Tomorrow’- A Nigerian Film Shot In 1958

Three Roads To Tomorrow‘ is a 23 minutes coloured film shot in Nigeria in 1958 by BP (British Petroleum) Film.

 

SYNOPSIS
‘Three Nigerian students from different corners of Nigeria come to Ibadan University. While they sit talking in a dance club, the film traces back each of their journeys to the university. Scenes of their homes give a new impression of an old country, and we come to understand how a modern network of communications – all dependent on oil and petrol – has opened up what was not so long ago inaccessible territory’ (Monthly Film Bulletin, 1961, 14). Continue reading ‘Three Roads To Tomorrow’- A Nigerian Film Shot In 1958

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Palava- The First Film Shot in Nigeria, 1926

A scene in the film
A scene from the film

Palava is the first film shot in Nigeria in the year 1926. The British film which was written and directed by Geoffrey Barkas was shot among the Sura, Angas, Mangu and Berom people of Plateau and Bauchi in Northern Nigeria and was released on April 25, 1927. The film tells the story of a jealous British tin miner (Mark Fernandez) in Nigeria who with alcohol arouse Continue reading Palava- The First Film Shot in Nigeria, 1926

First Plane Crash In Nigeria, April 1942

Site of first plane crash in Nigeria
Site of first plane crash in Nigeria

The first plane crash in Nigeria occurred on the 12th of April, 1942 about 8:15pm on a hill (Igbo Ilapa) in the serene and rustic town of Ikogosi, Ekiti State, the same town that houses the popular tourist attraction where warm and cold spring co-existed on a spot. Continue reading First Plane Crash In Nigeria, April 1942

Macpherson Constitution of 1951

Macpherson constitution of 1951

In 1948, Sir John Stuart Macpherson succeeded Sir Authur Richards as the Governor-General of Nigeria. Soon after he (Macpherson) resumed office, he began to draft a new constitution for the country. He was very patient and careful in the process so as not to repeat the mistake of his predecessor, Sir Authur Richards. Sir Authur Richards’ constitution, also known as Richards constitution of 1946, was severely criticized by Nigerian nationalists on the ground that it was imposed on Nigerians and operated without prior consultation. Continue reading Macpherson Constitution of 1951

The Osogbo War of 1840

Osogbo map

After the Fulanis systematically captured and made Ilorin their territory, they sacked the old Oyo Empire in 1835/1636. They were still not satisfied with their victory; they wished to extend their rule deep into the heart of Yoruba land. Thus in 1840, they set to capture Osogbo, a Yoruba town. The Fulanis, under the command of Ali, the Hausa balogun of Ilorin, laid siege on Osogbo. When the king of Osogbo realized that the Ilorins were too strong for the Osogbo army, he summoned the Ibadans for help. Ibadan immediately sent some auxiliaries to Osogbo under the command of Obele alias Mobitan, and Alade Abimpagun. As this force could not stop the Ilorins, another contingent was sent to Osogbo under a more experienced leader. But still the Ilorins won every battle and gained more ground. Continue reading The Osogbo War of 1840

The Mugbamugba War- Second Attempt of a Failed Expulsion

Fulani Warriors

After Are-Ona-Kakanfo Afonja was murdered and Ilorin was seized by the Fulani Jamma, Alimi (the son of Abdul Salam) became the first Fulani ruler of Ilorin not with the title of Oba or Baale but Emir which solidifies that the total control of Ilorin, a Yoruba town had gone to the Fuanis. In a bid to restore the control of Ilorin in the hands of the Yorubas, Toyeje, the Baale of Ogbomoso and the new Are-Ona-Kakanfo, led an attack on Ilorin to expel the Fulanis, but unfortunately, he failed drastically. After sometime, between the months of March and April (when locus fruit i.e Igba was ripe for harvest), another attempt was made by the Yorubas to chase the intruding Fulanis out of Ilorin but failed again. Continue reading The Mugbamugba War- Second Attempt of a Failed Expulsion

The Egba- Dahomey War (1851-1864)

Dahomen Women Warriors
Dahomen Women Warriors (Amazon Women)

The Egba-Dahomey war, as the name suggests, was a war that broke out between the two neighboring kingdoms of Egba and Dahomey (now the Republic of Benin) over territorial expansion caused by the quest of the latter to stabilize her economy. The Egba-Dahomey war was the third of the destructive wars that plagued the Yoruba nation in the nineteenth century, proceeding the Owu-Ife war: 1821-1828; and the 1840 Osogbo war. Continue reading The Egba- Dahomey War (1851-1864)

The Ibadan All-Nigerian Constitutional Conference of 1950

Nigerian Map

On the 9th of January, 1950, delegates from the northern, eastern and western regions of Nigeria met as a body in Ibadan to discuss issues on the new constitution Sir Macpherson was drafting (Macpherson constitution of 1951). Continue reading The Ibadan All-Nigerian Constitutional Conference of 1950

The Richards Constitution of 1946

Constitution Of Nigeria

Governor Bernard Bourdilloun succeeded Sir Hugh Clifford as the Governor General of Nigeria in 1939 and later left the office in 1945. In 1939, while still in power, he turned the Northern and Southern Protectorates into provinces and divided the Southern province into Eastern and Western provinces, while the Northern province remained untouched. Continue reading The Richards Constitution of 1946

Berlin Conference And The Partition of West Africa

Berlin Conference

In the due course to get a share of the African continent, all European nations participating in the struggle to have a colony in Africa had lost their decency and orderliness in the run. The tension and clashes among these competitors was boiling at its hottest degree. It was at that time that Otto Von Bismarck, a German Chancellor, convened a meeting at Berlin (Berlin Conference) with the purpose of resolving the disputes among the competitors without the use of arms. Continue reading Berlin Conference And The Partition of West Africa

Lagos Times and Gold Coast Colony Advertiser

Lagos Times And Gold Coast Advertiser_OldNaija

The Lagos Times and Gold Coast Colony Advertiser was the third newspaper established in Nigeria. It succeeded Anglo African of Robert Campbell and Iwe Irohin of Rev. Henry Townsend. The newspaper was established on Wednesday, 10th November, 1880 by Mr. Richard Olamilege Beale Blaize and was edited by Mr. Andrew M. Thomas and Mojola Agbebi. Continue reading Lagos Times and Gold Coast Colony Advertiser

Iwe Irohin- The First Newspaper In Nigeria

Henry Townsend

In the 1840s, the missionaries of the Presbyterian Church began to arrive in Nigeria. They settled in an area known as English Town in Calabar. Among these missionaries was Rev. Henry Townsend who later moved to Abeokuta in the 1850s. In Abeokuta, he established a printing press in 1854 which he used, five years later, to publish the first newspaper in Nigeria called “Iwe Irohin Fun Awon Ara Egba Ati Yoruba.”
Continue reading Iwe Irohin- The First Newspaper In Nigeria

The Ibadan-Ijaye War (1861-1862)

Olumo Rock In Abeokuta, Ogun State

The Ibadan-Ijaye war broke out in 1861 between Ibadan and Ijaye over who to succeed the old Oyo empire as the political head of Yorubaland. The two rebelling towns sprang up from the ruins of the Old Oyo empire which was destroyed in 1836 by the Fulanis. Ibadan, Ijaye and the new Oyo, also called Oyo Atiba, succeeded the Old Oyo empire after its destruction. According to Latisosa, a Balogun of Ibadanland, Continue reading The Ibadan-Ijaye War (1861-1862)

Mungo Park In West Africa

 

Mungo Park in West Africa
Mungo Park

 

The ball was now on the feet of a young Scotsman, to see whether he could succeed where his predecessors had failed. This man was Mungo Park, who was one of the greatest explorers in the history of African exploration. He made two journeys. The first was in 1795 when he Continue reading Mungo Park In West Africa

Usman Dan Fodio (1754-1817)

Usman Dan Fodio

Usman Dan Fodio, born in 1754 to a Torokawa parents, was the leader of the greatest Jihad in Nigeria and West Africa. He studied law, theology and philosophy in Agades under a man called Umar. The study of these subjects inspired him to accept the religion of Islam. Usman Dan Fodio migrated to Gobir after completing his school in Agades. In Gobir, paganism was mixed with Islam which really irritated and infuriated Usman Dan Fodio, and he began to Continue reading Usman Dan Fodio (1754-1817)